How Important Politicians Believe They Are

    Do not think about, write about or deal with  human behavior without determining the effects of incentives.

   Wherein we see a politician, part of the cabal making Washington D.C. an expensive place to live, by making it an artificial center of economic activity, complains about the high cost of living there.

Moran: Members Can’t Afford to Live Decently in D.C.
By Hannah Hess

Despite what constituents outside of Washington might think, members of Congress are underpaid, a House Legislative Branch appropriator suggested Thursday.

Virginia Democrat James P. Moran said he plans to highlight the injustice by introducing an amendment to the Legislative Branch bill during its full committee markup, and at floor consideration of the bill. Moran made the comments while the bill that funds members’ $174,000 salaries was being marked up in the Legislative Branch subcommittee.

“I think the American people should know that the members of Congress are underpaid,” Moran told CQ Roll Call. “I understand that it’s widely felt that they underperform, but the fact is that this is the board of directors for the largest economic entity in the world.”

<insert>

     Whoa. First, who died and made you a director? Secondly, this is, of course, exactly what politicians shouldn’t be doing, directing the economic activity of others. When they try, it always ends in suppression of real economic activity.

The senior appropriator pointed out that some members have taken to living out of their offices to save money, while others have “small little apartment units” that make it impossible to spend the time they should with their families.

Most state legislatures provide their members with a per diem allowance, Moran argues, so the federal government should do the same.

The Legislative Branch appropriations bill introduced by Republicans on Wednesday aims to show the chamber’s commitment to austerity by holding spending at current levels. It would continue a freeze on lawmaker salaries that has been in place since 2010.

As for a dollar amount, Moran hasn’t yet thought that through. He said it would probably be consistent with what the federal government provides to other employees.

According to the Congressional Research Service, members began receiving a $6 per diem in 1789. The rate was eventually raised to $8 and remained there until 1856, when members began to receive annual salaries.

Moran assumes the amendment will not pass, admitting “this is wholly quixotic,” but he may bring it up on the House floor to garner attention.

“Our pay has been frozen for three years and we’re planning on freezing it a fourth year. … A lot of members can’t even afford to live decently in Washington,” he said.

Moran isn’t the only Member of Congress to spark a debate on member pay in recent years.

Moran recently announced he would retire from Congress.  Roughly a dozen Democrats are making a bid for the seat in Virginia’s 8th District, which includes the inner suburbs of D.C.  The seat is considered Safe Democratic by the Rothenberg Political Report/Roll Call.

<end>

   “Directors” of the economy. Supposedly legislators exist to provide courts and the military. When did they become directors?

      It’s not that politicians have the wrong policies that’s the problem. It’s that they have policies.

Government Job or Respect–Which’ll It Be?
Cheerio and ttfn,
Grant Coulson, Ph.D.
Author, “Days of Songs and Mirrors: A Jacobite in the ‘45.”
Cui Bono–Cherchez les Contingencies

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: