Getting The Correct Answer The Wrong Way

    Do not think about, write about or deal with  human behavior without determining the effects of incentives.

     Only in cults are results judged by methods. This reminds me of Mia Farrow’s line in Annie Hall. “I had my first orgasm last week, but my doctor told me it was the wrong kind.”

    A week ago, I watched a mother try to do homework with her son using mathematics materials that were so poorly written I was ashamed to be near them.

This Common Core math problem asks kids to write the ‘friendly’ answer, instead of the correct one!
By Staff

A second grader’s answers to a Common Core-aligned math worksheet were marked as incorrect because they weren’t “friendly” enough… even though they were the right answers.

A screenshot of the worksheet was posted to Twitter. The teacher wrote that even though the questions — addition and subtraction problems — were solved correctly, the student used the wrong technique to arrive at the answers.

“Correct answers, but let’s find the ‘friendly’ numbers,” wrote the teacher.

The teacher wanted the student to solve “530 – 270 = ?” in the following manner: First, add 30 to both numbers, changing the problem to “560 – 300 = ?”. These numbers are the “friendly” numbers, because they are supposedly easier to work with.

The student, however, simply subtracted 270 from 530 the good old-fashioned way, arriving at the same answer. Unfortunately, this is not a Common Core-approved technique.

Though friendly numbers can be useful, the worksheet illustrates the weird priorities of Common Core, according to Twitchy:

In Common Core math, it often is not good enough to get the correct answer. Instead, students are required to show “higher order” thinking skills — in this case, use of the associative property. Yes, the associative property is important and should be taught at some point. Unfortunately, we suspect that many 7-year olds will not be able to understand this particular assignment.  With limited days in the school year, wouldn’t second graders — second graders! — be better off spending their time attempting to master the traditional subtraction algorithm?

The Daily Caller readers know that this is not the first Common Core worksheet to baffle young children and infuriate adults.

<end>

   Give a group money under sacred circumstances and this is what you get.

    One of the few useful math techniques is subtraction. One needs it to deal with one’s personal finances, doncha know? They shouldn’t be allowed to screw this up.

Government Job or Respect–Which’ll It Be?
Cheerio and ttfn,
Grant Coulson, Ph.D.
Author, “Days of Songs and Mirrors: A Jacobite in the ‘45.”
Cui Bono–Cherchez les Contingencies

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